ENGLISH ENGLISH
THE GILLIOT & ROELANTS TILE MUSEUM On April 22nd 1988, the Hemiksem municipality bought the Saint-Bernard’s Abbey from the Flemish Community. On May 7th 1988, the ‘Roelantsmuseum’, dedicated to the works of Joseph Roelants, who served as a designer at the Manufactures Céramiques d’Hémixem, Gilliot & Cie from 1919 until the 1950s, opened its doors. In 2009 the name of the museum was changed into ‘Gilliot & Roelants Tegel Museum’, because work of other designers, such as Ignace Verwilghen, Karel Hadermann, Sonja Leemans and others is also exhibited. In acquiring the Pozzo collection, the museum has become one of the most important specialised tile museums in the world. THE POZZO COLLECTION In 1968, the Italian Roberto Pozzo arrived in Leuven to study sociology. For 33 years, he lived and worked in Belgium. He started his collection in the 1970’s by purchasing a few tiles at flea markets, eventually resulting in a versatile collection counting more than 9,000 tiles. In order to assure the preservation of his impressive collection, Roberto Pozzo donated it to the King Baudouin Foundation on October 10 th  2016 that assigned the management of it to the Gilliot & Roelants Tegel Museum in Hemiksem. MANUFACTURES CÉRAMIQUES D’HÉMIXEM - GILLIOT & CIE The floor and wall tile factory S.A. Manufactures Céramiques d’Hémixem, Gilliot Frères, later known as Gilliot & Cie, was founded in 1897 by Georges Gilliot. The factory witnessed an enormous expansion. During its peak years, the company employed 1,585 workers and manufactured more than 400,000 tiles a day. For decades, the tile factory was the largest in continental Europe. Globalisation lead to a  process of scaling up in 1957, when the company merged with S.A. La Dyle – N.V. De Dijle, a former competitor located in Wijgmaal, near Leuven. The company's headquarters remained in Hemiksem. In the 1960’s, the Dutch company N.V. Koninklijke Sphinx became main shareholder. Production continued under the name of Sphinx Hemiksem. On April 19 th  1977 the decision was made to cease production. The last tiles were fired in 1978 and in 1985, the company was dissolved. The final liquidation followed in 1993.
THE GILLIOT & ROELANTS TILE MUSEUM On April 22nd 1988, the Hemiksem municipality bought the Saint-Bernard’s Abbey from the Flemish Community. On May 7th 1988, the ‘Roelantsmuseum’, dedicated to the works of Joseph Roelants, who served as a designer at the Manufactures Céramiques d’Hémixem, Gilliot & Cie from 1919 until the 1950s, opened its doors. In 2009 the name of the museum was changed into ‘Gilliot & Roelants Tegel Museum’, because work of other designers, such as Ignace Verwilghen, Karel Hadermann, Sonja Leemans and others is also exhibited. In acquiring the Pozzo collection, the museum has become one of the most important specialised tile museums in the world. THE POZZO COLLECTION In 1968, the Italian Roberto Pozzo arrived in Leuven to study sociology. For 33 years, he lived and worked in Belgium. He started his collection in the 1970’s by purchasing a few tiles at flea markets, eventually resulting in a versatile collection counting more than 9,000 tiles. In order to assure the preservation of his impressive collection, Roberto Pozzo donated it to the King Baudouin Foundation on October 10 th  2016 that assigned the management of it to the Gilliot & Roelants Tegel Museum in Hemiksem. MANUFACTURES CÉRAMIQUES D’HÉMIXEM - GILLIOT & CIE The floor and wall tile factory S.A. Manufactures Céramiques d’Hémixem, Gilliot Frères, later known as Gilliot & Cie, was founded in 1897 by Georges Gilliot. The factory witnessed an enormous expansion. During its peak years, the company employed 1,585 workers and manufactured more than 400,000 tiles a day. For decades, the tile factory was the largest in continental Europe. Globalisation lead to a  process of scaling up in 1957, when the company merged with S.A. La Dyle – N.V. De Dijle, a former competitor located in Wijgmaal, near Leuven. The company's headquarters remained in Hemiksem. In the 1960’s, the Dutch company N.V. Koninklijke Sphinx became main shareholder. Production continued under the name of Sphinx Hemiksem. On April 19 th  1977 the decision was made to cease production. The last tiles were fired in 1978 and in 1985, the company was dissolved. The final liquidation followed in 1993.
FR FR DE DE
EN EN